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The 81mm Non-Lethal InDirect Fire Munition is an integrated flash bang counter-personnel, non-lethal 81mm mortar round. The munition produces temporary optical and auditory impairment.
Lieutenant General Ronald L. Bailey
hosted more than 90 DoD and other
government agencies at an Active
Denial Technology Demonstration.
Lieutenant General Bailey was the
event's first volunteer to feel ADT's
effects first-hand.
USCENTCOM and USSOCOM hosted a familiarization fire (FAMFIRE) demonstration of non-lethal weapons. During the event, attendees had the opportunity to use some of the weapons and fire them in a controlled environment. Here a variety of pepperball and paintball non-lethal munitions are fired.
The event was to familiarize and demonstrate the capabilities of non-lethal munitions. During the event, attendees had the option to use some of the weapons and fire them in a controlled environment.
Here we see the effect of the Red White and Blue Star Cluster round.
Colonel April Vogel, Commander, 6th Air Mobility Wing, MacDill Air Force Base fires a 40MM Red White Blue Hail and Warning Round.

The event was to familiarize and demonstrate the capabilities of non-lethal munitions. During the event, attendees had the option to use some of the weapons and fire them in a controlled environment.
USCENTCOM and USSOCOM hosted a familiarization fire (FAMFIRE) demonstration of non-lethal weapons. During the event, attendees had the opportunity to use some of the weapons and fire them in a controlled environment.
The Embarked Security Team (EST) on Board USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7), along with Sailors from Coastal Riverine Squadron THREE's (CRS-3) boarded on Riverine Command Boats (RCBs), defend the vessel using dazzler non-lethal weapon and blank rounds during a simulated attack as it departs to support ships during Rim of the Pacific 2016. Twenty-six nations, comprising over 40 ships and submarines and over 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th iteration in the series that began in 1971 and is the world's largest international maritime exercise.
A Marine with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine regiment begins the non-lethal instructor course by being sprayed with Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) spray at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Sept. 30, 2015. Although being temporarily blind from the OC spray the Marines are still required to finish this course in less than four minutes.
Staff Sgt. Paul J. Delekto demonstrates baton strikes during nonlethal weapons and level one oleoresin capsicum spray training aboard Camp Foster Aug. 14. According to Delekto, the security augmentation force instructor and staff noncommissioned officer with mobile training team, Provost Marshal’s Office, Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, nonlethal weapons training includes all weapons and techniques that are not inherently deadly, such as batons, defensive tactics, pepper-based spray, and mechanical-advantage control holds.
Staff Sgt. Paul J. Delekto observes as a Japanese security guard employs apprehension tactics during nonlethal weapons and level one oleoresin capsicum spray training aboard Camp Foster Aug. 14. According to Delekto, the security augmentation force instructor and staff noncommissioned officer with mobile training team, Provost Marshal’s Office, Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, nonlethal weapons training includes all weapons and techniques that are not inherently deadly, such as batons, defensive tactics, pepper-based spray, and mechanical-advantage control holds.
A Japanese security guard receives a dose of oleoresin capsicum spray during nonlethal weapons and level one OC spray training aboard Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan, Aug. 14. According to Staff Sgt. Paul J. Delekto, mobile training team, Provost Marshal’s Office, Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, after being sprayed, the JSGs navigated through an obstacle course of Marines representing potential suspects.
A Japanese security guard executes a knee strike during nonlethal weapons and level one oleoresin capsicum spray training aboard Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan, Aug. 14. According to Delekto, the security augmentation force instructor and staff noncommissioned officer with mobile training team, Provost Marshal’s Office, Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, nonlethal weapons training includes all weapons and techniques that are not inherently deadly, such as batons, defensive tactics, pepper-based spray, and mechanical-advantage control holds.
Spc. Isaac Robledo (left) and Pvt. Greggory Savage, both combat engineers with Company B, 1st Bde. Eng. Bn., 1st ABCT, 1st Inf. Div., practice arming and disarming the M-7 Spider Landmine July 31 at Range 7 on Fort Riley, Kan. The Spider is an anti-personnel networked munitions system that can be securely commanded and controlled from up to 1,500 meters away that will replace anti-personnel mines.
Spc. Tara Morrison (left) and Pfc. Brian Hollenbeck, both with Headquarters Support Company, U.S. Army Africa, test the SQ.410 Translation System in Vicenza, Italy.
Marines with 2nd Battalion, 10th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division used riot shields and batons to protect themselves against role-players acting as local villagers during infantry immersion training at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, July 24, 2015. During the training exercise the Marines encountered the role-players in a simulated foreign country, who used various objects and weaponry to intimidate the Marines.
Michigan Army National Guard Soldiers from the Taylor-based 1776th Military Police Company use simulated pepper spray on role players who are posing as riotous victims of a simulated nuclear detonation, during an exercise at Fort Custer Training Center, Augusta, Mich., June 25, 2015. The exercise, Northern Exposure, integrates Michigan National Guard and civilian first responders to rehearse life sustaining capabilities during natural or man-made catastrophic events. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Denice Rankin/released)
160415-N-MD297-038 PACIFIC OCEAN (April 16, 2015) – Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Roderick Payne aims a Long Rang Acoustic Device (LRAD) at an incoming small craft during a Straits Transit exercise aboard Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2). Essex is underway participating in a certification exercise (CERTEX) with the Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG), which is comprised of amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) THREE and 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Huey D. Younger Jr./Released)
Sgt. 1st Class Patricia Krumnauer, chief of the Correctional Supervision Branch, 42nd Military Police Brigade, 593rd Sustainment Brigade, darts away instantly after getting engaged by the Active Denial System at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Aug. 6. The Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate conducted the training exercise to expose Soldiers to a weapon system that supports a full spectrum of operations, such as crowd dispersal, checkpoint security, and suppression of vehicle operators or occupants.
Private First Class Anthony Tucker, a military police officer with the Provost Marshals Office (PMO), receives a 50,000-volt charge from a Taser X26 during annual Taser training aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California, July 15. Personnel endured a charge from the Taser X26 for their initial training with the Taser. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Brian Marion/Released)
Military police and civilian law enforcement officers with the Marine Corps Air Station Miramar Provost Marshals Office (PMO) fire the Taser X26 during their annual Taser training aboard MCAS Miramar, California, July 15. The training helped familiarize the law enforcement personnel with standardized procedures for employing nonlethal weapons. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Brian Marion/Released)