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Category: U.S. Marine Corps

Jan. 4, 2022

GEN. DAVID H. BERGER ON THE MARINE CORPS OF THE FUTURE

Gen. David H. Berger, commandant of the Marine Corps, had Ryan Evans over for a discussion on the service he leads. As rising great powers and transformative technologies reshape warfare, presenting marines with new challenges, how should the Marine Corps adapt? From talent management to force transformation, listen to their wide-ranging conversation about what the service needs to become in order to remain a top-tier fighting force.

May 15, 2021

Marines break ground on new war game center

The Marine Corps broke ground here on what it plans will be a state-of-the-art war gaming center, to direct war fighting experiments and pull feedback from across the fleet to continuously refine how Marines fight.

April 6, 2021

Joint Intermediate Force Capabilities

Intermediate Force Capabilities The requirement for Non-Lethal Weapons (NLW) emerged during U.S. military operations in Somalia. Consequently, the Department of Defense (DoD) NLW Program was created in 1996, the Commandant of the Marine Corps (CMC) was designated as the DoD NLW Program Executive Agent, and the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate (JNLWD) was established to manage the daily activities of the program.

Feb. 22, 2021

Sustaining the force: MCAGCC PMO trains Marines in security guard course

Every six months, Marines from around the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center supplement the MCAGCC Provost Marshal’s Office with personnel through the Fleet Assistance Program. “The Fleet Assistance Program is an often misunderstood assignment,” said Maj. Braden Trainor, the MCAGCC Provost Marshal. “It is not an ‘extended working party’ where Marines are sent to conduct menial tasks unspecific to military occupational specialty.” “At MCAGCC, the Provost Marshal’s Office is a supported organization that receives Marines that meet selective requirements from the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force. PMO trains those Marines to conduct a real-world security and law enforcement mission in support of the installation,” he said.

Jan. 20, 2021

Watch commander – ensuring safety for all

U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Staling Amador, a watch commander with the Camp Foster Provost Marshal’s Office (PMO) and a native of Miami, Florida, shares his story as a Marine within Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Installations Pacific – Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler. PMO watch commanders are responsible for responding quickly and effectively to emergency calls while ensuring the safety of Marines, Status of Forces Agreement personnel, and local nationals on and off base. In addition, they oversee the training and mentorship of their patrolmen, to ensure they possess the knowledge, physical endurance and mental fortitude to successfully respond to a variety of situations.

Dec. 17, 2020

Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard Release Maritime Strategy

The U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard released a new tri-Service maritime strategy December 17, entitled Advantage at Sea. The document provides strategic guidance on how the sea services will prevail in day-to-day competition, crisis and conflict over the next decade. It also directs the services to deepen tri-service integration, aggressively pursue force modernization, and continue robust cooperation with allies and partners.

Dec. 7, 2020

Marines and Japanese troops train together to capture islands, coastal areas

One thousand Marines and Japanese soldiers will practice airborne assaults to capture “key maritime terrain” during a two-week exercise that kicked off Monday on Japan’s main island. Five hundred members of the 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment out of Camp Lejeune, N.C., are working with 400 troops from the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force’s 30th Infantry Regiment, their commander, Lt. Col. Neil Berry, said in a telephone interview Sunday from Camp Fuji, outside Tokyo.

Aug. 6, 2020

The Case for Change

Meeting the principal challenges facing the Corps The United States Marine Corps I lead in 2020 finds itself, like the rest of the U.S. defense establishment, at a crossroads. The passing of our Nation's "unipolar moment" and the emergence of revisionist great power competitors in China and Russia, coinciding with a sea change in the character of warfare driven by social and technological change, demands that we move rapidly to adapt to the circumstances of a new era.

May 31, 2020

The Commandant’s Guidance for the DOD Non-Lethal Weapons Program

Many Marines may be surprised to learn that the Commandant of the Marine Corps serves as the Department of Defense Executive Agent for Non-Lethal Weapons (NLW), or that Gen Charles C. Krulak, the 31st Commandant of the Marine Corps, volunteered the Marine Corps to take on a leadership role in their development in 1996. Almost 25 years later, NLW—which have been associated primarily with law enforcement and military security missions—are at a strategic turning point. NLW technology, to include directed energy systems, has advanced significantly.

Feb. 11, 2020

Camp Lejeune Provost Marshal’s Office conducts law enforcement tactics training

U.S. Marine and civilian military police officers with the Provost Marshal’s office (PMO), Marine Corps Installations East-Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune conducted a law enforcement defensive tactics and sustainment training session on MCB Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, Feb. 11, 2020.

Dec. 13, 2019

US Marines, sailors aboard MCB-Camp Butler take part in Security Augmentation Force Training

U.S. Marines and sailors aboard Marine Corps Base-Camp Smedley D. Butler took part in the Security Augmentation Force Training from Dec. 2 to Dec. 12 on Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan.

Oct. 15, 2019

Non-Lethal Weapons? Will Marines ever use this capability?

I used to believe that a question had an obvious answer. The United States military is the world’s most feared and lethal fighting force with the Marines being among the most aggressive warriors within that force. Beyond crowd control during peacekeeping in lieu of (ILO) operations, considering the tactical employability of non-lethal weapons (NLW) as a young combat arms officer seemed irrelevant and impractical. As a tank officer, and more recently as an acquisitions program manager, I spent the majority of my career enhancing the lethality of the Corps. Given the importance of strengthening warfighting capabilities with limited time and resources, the significance of NLW, even for kinetic and potentially lethal operations, was not immediately intuitive. However, once I moved beyond conceptualizing NLW as essential equipment for only Marine Security Guards and military police, it did not take long for me to understand their utility, relevance, and importance across the spectrum of conflict.

Oct. 2, 2019

Navy, Marines express interest in ‘stackable’ modular offensive grenades for the future

The Crane, Ind.-based Naval Surface Warfare Center issued a request for information about the modular grenades last month, along with several other early-stage procurement notices about several flash-bang grenade variants. The Marine Corps also has expressed interest in the stacking grenades. The notices come as the military looks to expand its nonlethal-weapons capabilities for a complex, modern battlefield, where troops might encounter more low-intensity conflict scenarios or situations in which civilians and enemy combatants are intermixed.

Aug. 24, 2019

Pentagon’s Non-Lethal Weapons Office Pushing Gray-Zone Warfare Tools

The Pentagon’s Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate is hoping to reframe the talk about non-lethal weapons amid a push by the Defense Department to boost lethality for high-end warfare. The office’s director, Marine Corps Col. Wendell Leimbach, instead wants to talk about capability gaps in an era of gray zone warfare with Russia and China and where “intermediate force capabilities” – an umbrella term that also includes non-lethal weapons – would give American forces a better chance to compete.

June 19, 2019

Marine Corps at the forefront for ground-based lasers

A drone-killing, directed energy weapon prototype is now in the hands of Marines. The Compact Laser Weapons System—or CLaWS—is the first ground-based laser approved by the Department of Defense for use by warfighters on the ground.

Nov. 25, 2009

First Marines to test EOF module equipment

CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – Many Marines may not find it difficult to utilize deadly force in serious conditions, but when the circumstances call for something less permanent, Marines will be prepared to

Nov. 15, 2009

7th Iraqi Army Division leads advances in riot control

CAMP MEJID, Iraq – In an instant, an assembly of hostile pedestrians can flood the streets of a city with one mission — to make their point known through force. Small business owners' livelihoods can

Oct. 30, 2009

Conference and Capabilities Exercise 2009 Features Non-Lethal Capabilities

STUTTGART, Germany – The Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Program (JNLWP) is increasing awareness of non-lethal weapons (NLWs) throughout the U.S. European Command (EUCOM) and U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM)

Sept. 14, 2009

Marine Corps' Top Leadership Visits the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate

QUANTICO, Va. – General James T. Conway, Commandant of the Marine Corps and Executive Agent for the Department of Defense Non-Lethal Weapons Program, and Sgt. Maj. Carlton W. Kent, Sergeant Major of

Aug. 27, 2009

Non-Lethal Weapons Capabilties Highlighted During Exercise

STUTTGART, Germany – Personnel from U.S. European Command and U.S. Africa Command demonstrated the growing importance and capabilities of non-lethal weapons (NLW) during a two-day conference and