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Archive: October, 2019

Oct. 29, 2019

Directed Energy Weapons Move Closer to Prime Time

The US military has doubled its spending on directed energy weapons over the past two years, and the investment is bearing fruit. Earlier this month, the Air Force successfully tested five prototype systems and is preparing to deploy at least two of them overseas by the end of 2020.

Oct. 25, 2019

Air Force Research Laboratory Hosts Directed Energy Futures 2060 Summit

The Directed Energy Futures Summit, held on Oct. 16, was led by Dr. Richard Joseph, Air Force Chief Scientist, to chart a course for the future of Directed Energy (DE) technologies.

Oct. 24, 2019

Do microwave cones have a place in the counterdrone zone?

With a cone pointed at the sky extending from an uncannily familiar barrel, the form factor of the microwave weapon was unmistakable. The Time Integrated Gigawatt Electromagnetic Response, or TIGER, developed by Leidos, made its public debut at the 2019 meeting of the Association of the U.S. Army. Melding the stylistic choices of a 1950s sci-fi reel with color schemes and lived reality of the forever war, Leidos bills the TIGER as part of a balanced counterdrone diet.

Oct. 21, 2019

Navy ’20-something’ Civilians Develop Power Solution for Electric Weapons Aboard Warships

Burg was among six Navy junior engineers and scientists who interacted with Sailors over the course of seven days last spring to see how the ship’s power was monitored, distributed, and controlled at sea. Along the way, they sought answers to one follow-on question after another: how much power is available aboard ships with directed energy weapons? How much power will be required? What can done to resolve power gaps for electric weapons?

Oct. 15, 2019

Non-Lethal Weapons? Will Marines ever use this capability?

I used to believe that a question had an obvious answer. The United States military is the world’s most feared and lethal fighting force with the Marines being among the most aggressive warriors within that force. Beyond crowd control during peacekeeping in lieu of (ILO) operations, considering the tactical employability of non-lethal weapons (NLW) as a young combat arms officer seemed irrelevant and impractical. As a tank officer, and more recently as an acquisitions program manager, I spent the majority of my career enhancing the lethality of the Corps. Given the importance of strengthening warfighting capabilities with limited time and resources, the significance of NLW, even for kinetic and potentially lethal operations, was not immediately intuitive. However, once I moved beyond conceptualizing NLW as essential equipment for only Marine Security Guards and military police, it did not take long for me to understand their utility, relevance, and importance across the spectrum of conflict.

Oct. 11, 2019

JBSA partners with UTSA, Southwest Research Institute to address Electromagnetic Defense Strategy

Joint Base San Antonio, along with research partners from the National Security Collaboration Center at the University of Texas at San Antonio and Southwest Research Institute, had their inaugural Domestic Electromagnetic Spectrum Operations, or DEMSO, Working Group meeting Sept. 27.

Oct. 2, 2019

Navy, Marines express interest in ‘stackable’ modular offensive grenades for the future

The Crane, Ind.-based Naval Surface Warfare Center issued a request for information about the modular grenades last month, along with several other early-stage procurement notices about several flash-bang grenade variants. The Marine Corps also has expressed interest in the stacking grenades. The notices come as the military looks to expand its nonlethal-weapons capabilities for a complex, modern battlefield, where troops might encounter more low-intensity conflict scenarios or situations in which civilians and enemy combatants are intermixed.