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Acoustic Hailing Devices (AHD) project intelligible speech out to extended ranges. A number of devices created by various manufacturers are in use throughout the Department of Defense. In addition to long range projection of speech for warning or instructional purposes, the devices are also capable of transmitting loud tones that can distract or deter personnel from approaching U.S. positions or vessels.
The Non-Lethal Indirect Fire Munition is an 81mm mortar round. Upon arrival over a target area, the case opens and discharges 14 sub-munitions. Those sub-munitions cover an area causing a non-lethal “flash-bang” effect to suppress personnel targets on the ground without causing permanent injury. Parachutes attached to the two sections of mortar casing enable the body of the munition to fall to earth slowly, to avoid inadvertent injury to personnel below.
Picatinny Arsenal engineer, Michael Markowitch, holding a demonstration model of the Indirect Fire Munition (IDFM) Non-Lethal Cargo Carrier Mortar for which he and engineers Francesco Rizzi, Bryan Drake, Jason Surmanek, Samuel Perez, Raymond Trohanowsky, Wooje Na, and Piotr Czerechowski were granted US Patent No 9528802 B1.
Solid State Active Denial Technology mounted on gimbal with downsized power supply. Demonstrates that the technology can be manufactured in a size that has operational utility.
LROI delivers a warning effect
at distances of 3000 meters and
increases irradiance at ranges
up to 2000 meters to provide
visual suppression of the target.
The U.S. Navy is
transitioning its
Long-Range Ocular
Interrupter, known as LROI, to
a rapid deployment capability
program for initial fielding.
A demonstration using the Active Denial
System 2, embarked aboard an Army
Landing Craft Utility vessel, was conducted
to demonstrate the technology’s benefits in a
maritime environment.
Philippine Armed Forces service members observe a demonstration of the pre-emplaced electric vehicle stopper, "The Vehicle Tazer" system while partaking in a joint non-lethal weapons demonstration and assessment during Balikatan 2014 at Crow Valley, Capas Tarlac, Republic of the Philippines, May 8, 2014. Balikatan is an annual bilateral training evolution that helps maintain a high level of interoperability and enhances military-to-military relations and combined combat capabilities. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Allison DeVries/Released)
Cpl. Kyle Carpenter gets an inside look at the state-of-the-art technologies on display at the Museum of Flight during Marine Week Seattle. The Medal of Honor recipient talks to Capt Stephenson John about the Active Denial System (ADS). The ADS is an advanced, long-range, non-lethal, directed energy, counter-personnel capability that assists in minimizing civilian casualties and collateral damage.
The improved flash-bang grenade
uses very small quantities of thermobarric materials
to provide a greatly enhanced flash intensity and duration
to aid users in multiple mission sets.
The Improved Flash-Bang Grenade
has a reduced smoke output, enabling better
situational awareness in dynamic environments.
The 81mm Non-Lethal InDirect Fire Munition is an integrated flash bang counter-personnel, non-lethal 81mm mortar round. The munition produces temporary optical and auditory impairment.
Lieutenant General Ronald L. Bailey
hosted more than 90 DoD and other
government agencies at an Active
Denial Technology Demonstration.
Lieutenant General Bailey was the
event's first volunteer to feel ADT's
effects first-hand.
USCENTCOM and USSOCOM hosted a familiarization fire (FAMFIRE) demonstration of non-lethal weapons. During the event, attendees had the opportunity to use some of the weapons and fire them in a controlled environment. Here a variety of pepperball and paintball non-lethal munitions are fired.
USCENTCOM and USSOCOM hosted a familiarization fire (FAMFIRE) demonstration of non-lethal weapons. During the event, attendees had the opportunity to use some of the weapons and fire them in a controlled environment.
Colonel April Vogel, Commander, 6th Air Mobility Wing, MacDill Air Force Base fires a 40MM Red White Blue Hail and Warning Round.

The event was to familiarize and demonstrate the capabilities of non-lethal munitions. During the event, attendees had the option to use some of the weapons and fire them in a controlled environment.
The event was to familiarize and demonstrate the capabilities of non-lethal munitions. During the event, attendees had the option to use some of the weapons and fire them in a controlled environment.
Here we see the effect of the Red White and Blue Star Cluster round.
The Embarked Security Team (EST) on Board USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7), along with Sailors from Coastal Riverine Squadron THREE's (CRS-3) boarded on Riverine Command Boats (RCBs), defend the vessel using dazzler non-lethal weapon and blank rounds during a simulated attack as it departs to support ships during Rim of the Pacific 2016. Twenty-six nations, comprising over 40 ships and submarines and over 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th iteration in the series that began in 1971 and is the world's largest international maritime exercise.
A Marine with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine regiment begins the non-lethal instructor course by being sprayed with Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) spray at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Sept. 30, 2015. Although being temporarily blind from the OC spray the Marines are still required to finish this course in less than four minutes.
A Japanese security guard executes a knee strike during nonlethal weapons and level one oleoresin capsicum spray training aboard Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan, Aug. 14. According to Delekto, the security augmentation force instructor and staff noncommissioned officer with mobile training team, Provost Marshal’s Office, Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, nonlethal weapons training includes all weapons and techniques that are not inherently deadly, such as batons, defensive tactics, pepper-based spray, and mechanical-advantage control holds.
Staff Sgt. Paul J. Delekto demonstrates baton strikes during nonlethal weapons and level one oleoresin capsicum spray training aboard Camp Foster Aug. 14. According to Delekto, the security augmentation force instructor and staff noncommissioned officer with mobile training team, Provost Marshal’s Office, Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, nonlethal weapons training includes all weapons and techniques that are not inherently deadly, such as batons, defensive tactics, pepper-based spray, and mechanical-advantage control holds.