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Director and Principal Deputy for Policy and Strategy Write Article for

the National Institute for Public Policy

“War is both timeless and ever-changing.”  This edict is among the first sentences in Warfighting, the doctrinal publication every U.S. Marine Corps second lieutenant receives at The Basic School as a cargo pocket-sized combat Bible.[1]  Beyond basic training, this imperative to adapt to change in combat environments is recognized at the Pentagon’s highest levels.  “The Nation must field sufficient, capable forces to defeat enemies and achieve sustainable outcomes that protect the American people and our vital interests,” states the 2018 National Defense Strategy.  “Our aim is a Joint Force that possesses decisive advantages for any likely conflict, while remaining proficient across the entire spectrum of conflict.”[2]  To maintain that decisive advantage, in addition to the lethal force that is the hallmark of the U.S. military, the Joint Force needs a toolset of “Intermediate Force Capabilities” (IFCs) that include non-lethal weapons as well as other non-lethal tools.  IFCs will bridge the gap that exists between a mission of mere presence and the use of lethal effects, allowing active measures when presence alone is insufficient to deter malign activities or when the use of lethal or destructive force is neither desired nor appropriate.

Read the full article here.

JIFCO Director Pens Article for August Marine Corps Gazette

         

Col Wendell Leimbach, Director of the Joint Intermediate Force Capabilities Office, published an article synopsizing the Commandant's recent guidance for the DOD Non-Lethal Weapons Program. The article was published in the August issue of the Marine Corps Gazette. The full article can be found HERE.

Pentagon Developing Electric Stun Grenade to Disable Everyone in a Room

Mr. David Law, Chief of the Joint Intermediate Force Capabilities Office Technology Division spoke with David Hambling of Forbes magazine about this capability in development. Read the full article HERE.

Welcome to the new Joint Intermediate Force Capabilities Office (JIFCO)!

 

The Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate (JNLWD) as you know it, is no longer. 

The Commandant of the Marine Corps’ 2020 Executive Agent’s Planning Guidance outlines the mission and vision for the new Joint Intermediate Force Capabilities Office (JIFCO).  This milestone in the DOD NLW Program’s history ensures that the Department of Defense mainstreams the use of the vital and relevant tools known as Intermediate Force Capabilities (IFCs).  IFCs, which exist between presence and lethal effects, enable U.S. and allied forces to deliver accurate, tailorable, and compelling effects in complex and ambiguous scenarios while preventing unintended escalation of hostilities, unnecessary loss of life, or destruction of critical infrastructure. 

Team JIFCO looks forward to serving the Joint Force and its strategic partners. [Click on the image to read the full planning guidance]

Reports on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict

United Nations Assistance Mission: Afghanistan (UNAMA) prepares regular reports in accordance with its UN Security Council mandate, undertaking a range of activities aimed at minimizing the impact of the armed conflict on civilians. Since 2012, the reports have been prepared jointly with the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Reports using a consistent methodology have been maintained since 2009. Note that earlier reports from 2007 and 2008 follow a previous reporting system and are included here for reference purposes only.

First Quarter, 2020 Report

 

Service-Related Non-Lethal Weapons Information

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 National
Guard Bureau

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FOR POINTS OF CONTACT FOR EACH SERVICE REGARDING INTERMEDIATE FORCE CAPABILITIES, CLICK THE LINKS ABOVE OR CLICK THE CONTACT TAB AT THE TOP OF THE PAGE. 

In the News

Anticipating the Human Costs of Great Power Conflict
Nov. 9, 2020 - As bipartisan calls to “end endless war” intensify, the U.S. military has already turned to its next challenge: great power conflict. Over the last few years, U.S. defense policy has undergone a formal reorientation away from counterinsurgency and counterterrorism and toward great power competition with countries like China and Russia. The Obama administration’s 2015 National Military Strategy focused on deterring, denying, and defeating State adversaries, while the Trump administration’s 2018 National Defense Strategy identifies China and Russia as the main priorities for the Department of Defense (DOD) because of the “magnitude of the threats they pose to U.S. security and prosperity today, and the potential for those threats to increase in the future.” This pivot has already resulted in concrete changes to DOD planning, training, budget requests, and overall strategic philosophy, with even more significant changes anticipated as each branch of the military continues to refine their warfighting concepts with an eye towards great power conflict. The 2017 update to Army Field Manual 3-0 (FM 3-0), for example, focuses almost entirely on deterring and defeating a major adversary, predicting a war “more chaotic, intense, and highly destructive than those the Army has experienced in the past several decades.”

Department of Defense reaches out to industry to synchronize C-sUAS solutions
Nov. 2, 2020 - The sky is getting congested. Rapid increases in the number and type of drones in the air is leading to new challenges when it comes to determining friend or foe, both at home and abroad. With uses ranging from benign recreation, to far more alarming applications like gathering intelligence or wreaking havoc on a battlefield, these readily available and inexpensive small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) are easily operated and growing in popularity.

DOD Posts Webpage to Aid in Reporting Civilian Casualties
Oct. 23, 2020 - The U.S. military goes to extraordinary lengths to protect civilians on the battlefield, but sometimes casualties occur. The department has now created a website so people can report information on civilian casualties.


Why Intermediate Force Capabilities?

Intermediate Force Capabilities (IFC) deliver discriminate and reversible effects without causing unnecessary destruction or loss of life.  Skilled application of IFCs supports mission objectives by complementing lethal force without unintentionally initiating, escalating, or prolonging extensive (and expensive) hostilities.
 Vision, Mission, Definition      

VIDEO: Non-Lethal Weapons in NATO and National Concepts